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Alex Jones Spied on His Wife and Ex-Wife, Texts Reveal – Yostrive

For a guy who continually complains he’s being secretly surveilled, Alex Jones sure does a lot of spying.

In recent years, the conspiracy theorist has used a network of informers and spies to covertly surveil his ex-wife — and he’s used a similar arrangement to track his current spouse, according to texts on Jones’ phone described to Yostrive by multiple sources. In some instances, texts were read aloud to Yostrive, including month, year, and time.

The texts describe extensive surveillance during his multi-year custody battle with his ex-wife Kelly Jones — including information on her activities and whereabouts, three people familiar with the matter tell Yostrive. One of the sources says the pundit’s ex-wife was being monitored by a ragtag “spy ring” of human intelligence. 

“Alex is obsessed with me, has had me followed for years, has done everything to infringe on my liberties and personal freedom to impose himself into my life,” Kelly Jones says. “My life is a gauntlet of waiting for his next nefarious or disingenuous or overtly threatening move. I’m not surprised to find out that he’s engaged in this activity. I would really like to find out the extent to which this has occurred, [and] if it’s even legal.”

According to another of the sources, the texts reveal Alex Jones’ snooping habits extend to his current marriage. Jones’ phone, the source said, indicated he has been tracking his current wife, Erika Wulff Jones, until 2020, and possibly beyond. The texts reveal Alex Jones had enlisted Tim Enlow, a former Blackwater mercenary on his security detail, to track his wife. In the texts, Alex Jones would repeatedly check in for updates on Wullff Jones’ location. Enlow’s responses included screenshots of a GPS phone app that he said was tracking her car, as well as Enlow’s own descriptions of her physical location, according to the source. Wulff Jones did not respond to a request for comment, including on whether she was aware Enlow was relaying her whereabouts to her husband.

Alex Jones has frequently criticized government surveillance across a series of conspiracy theories espoused by the TV host in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. In 2005, he released a documentary, Martial Law 9/11: Rise of the Police State, a 9/11 conspiracy screed which warns that the “Constitution has been shredded and America is now a Police State.” When the COVID pandemic began, Jones’ InfoWars warned that public health measures to monitor the disease represented “a ChiCom-style panopticon control grid to monitor every citizen under the guise of tracking the coronavirus infection spread.”

During a trial in early August, Jones’ legal defense team apparently accidentally sent a digital copy of their client’s cell phone to the plaintiff’s attorney, Mark Bankston. Bankston, who represented parents of the victims of the Sandy Hook school shooting, said the records included Jones’ phone calls and text messages going back years. Due to Jones’ involvement with the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, the House select committee investigating the attack asked Bankston to turn over the digital copy’s contents. He complied, and while the messages reportedly did not yield much about Jones’ connections to Jan. 6, they have offered new, alarming details about the far-right radio host’s personal conduct. 

In response to an email from Yostrive, Bankston wrote: “I appreciate you reaching out, but we have no public comment at this time.” A spokesman for the Jan. 6 committee declined to comment on this story.

The contents of the phones described to Yostrive echo other reports of Jones’ marital behavior. Sometime in 2019, Jones hired a private investigator to follow Wulff Jones. That August, the private investigator called police to report Alex Jones’ concerns that Wulff Jones may have been “suicidal” and “intoxicated.” Police arrested Wulff Jones and charged her with driving while intoxicated. She is still awaiting trial.

Bankston claims that Alex Jones’ text messages revealed instances of him invading his wife’s privacy. The attorney said last month that Jones had shared an “intimate photo” of Wulff Jones with former Trump political advisor Roger Stone. “I don’t know if that was consensual,” Bankston said of the exchange. “And if it wasn’t consensual, and Mrs. Wulff Jones should know about that.” In a subsequent interview with Insider, Wulff Jones said she was “unaware” of the exchange and that she is “upset that he took privilege to send the image to someone without my knowledge.”

Disputes between Alex and Kelly Jones have, arguably, been even more intense. Alex Jones’ custody battle with his ex-wife has been a bitter, years-long court battle. The two married in 2007 and had three children before she filed for divorce in 2013. Alex Jones lost primary custody of the couple’s three children in 2017, when a judge granted Kelly Jones shared custody and the right to determine where their children live.

The couple’s oldest son has since turned 18 but Kelly Jones has repeatedly sought to gain greater custody rights of their two daughters. In one of the most recent legal battles between the two, Jones’ ex-wife sought to gain custody of their children for two weeks following the InfoWars host’s appearance at a rally protesting COVID-19 restrictions at the outset of the global pandemic in 2020. The emergency request—subsequently denied by a judge—asked the court to send the couple’s daughters to their mother to protect them against a potential COVID-19 infection following his exposure to a crowd of protesters.

Kelly Jones in 2020 sought a similar emergency request for the court to remove their children from Alex Jones’ home after he was arrested for driving while intoxicated a month earlier. A judge did not remove the children from his home but did require him to submit to a drug and alcohol test. In 2021, after a judge ordered Jones to stay away from his ex-wife, he hired a helicopter to circle over Kelly’s home, an act she claimed was “terrifying” to the couple’s daughter. 

After Bankston revealed that Alex Jones’ attorneys had accidentally sent his phone records to the Sandy Hook parents’ attorneys, Kelly Jones said that her attorneys would try to subpoena the data for use in her custody litigation. “It’s not even about my kids, it’s about control,” she told Insider. “Controlling me.”

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